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Luibeg

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Luibeg - 16th July 2010

Luibeg is the 19th century keeper's cottage near the mouth of Gleann Laoigh Beag.  Luibeg stands on the right-bank of Laoigh Beag.

In 1833 the Old Parish Register records the birth of James McHardy - naming William McHardy ''Game Keeper Glen Luigh'' as the father. 

References to the location of this cottage are vague - it's possible that this cottage was literally in Gleann Laoigh rather than in the mouth of Glean Laoigh Beag, but there is some early evidence that suggests that the existing Luibeg was built from ; replaced by ; or built near the site of the cottage occupied by William McHardy in the early 1830s.

In 1837 an uncredited writer in The Penny Magazine (1837) refers to the cottage - writing :

From Mar Lodge, for a distance of some twenty miles, not a home is passed, except a forester's cottage in Glen Lui

- The Penny Magazine (1837) (p165)

It's logically unlikely that the habitable cottage occupied by William McHardy in 1833 was demolished, and a new one built in another location by 1937.  The same logic suggests that the cottage of 1833 is the same cottage referred to in 1837, and the same cottage recorded in census of 1841.

In 1841 the census of that year shows Glen Lui was occupied by William McHardy, and family.  The 1841 census collected few details ; recording merely that William was a male servant ; leaving us to infer that he was a paid employee rather than a independent tenant.  The family includes a 7 year-old James, which I infer, is the same James born in 1833.

In 1851 the census of that year shows Glen Lui was occupied by Gamekeeper Peter McHardy, and family.  Interestingly Thomas Grierson visited, and spent a night, at Luibeg about then recording his visit in Grierson (1851) leaving us a description of Peter McHardy, and the area - writing :

I then proceeded up Glen Lui for three or four miles, as far as the forester's lodge, at the entrance of Glen-Lui-Beg ... He [Peter McHardy] is considerably above six feet in height, straight and active, without an ounce of redundant flesh

... I spent the night very comfortably, and, after an early breakfast, went up Glen Derry with my entertainer and his assistant, on their customary rounds.  Glen Derry and Lui-Beg are unlike anything one meets with even in the Highlands.  The forester's house is the only one they contain

– Grierson (1851) (p196, p198)

In 1861 the census of that year shows Glenlui Lodge was occupied by Deer Watcher Alexander McDonald, and family.

In 1871 the census of that year shows Lui Beg Cottage was occupied by Gamekeeper Ronald McDonald, and his sister Charlotte - probably living with him as housekeeper.

In 1881 the census of that year shows Luibeg was occupied by Gamekeeper John McIntosh, and family.

In 1891 the census of that year shows Luibeg was still occupied by Gamekeeper John McIntosh, and family.

In 1901 the census of that year shows Luibeg was still occupied by Gamekeeper John McIntosh, and family.  John McIntosh died in 1914 after retiring, and was almost certainly replaced at Luibeg before his death.

In 1914 the valuation roll of that year shows Lui Beg was occupied by Gamekeeper Alexander McDonald, and family - having moved there from Bynack Lodge.

In 1925 Alexander is referred to in Gordon (1925) as ''the stalker of Glen Lui Beg'', and almost certainly he continued in that role into the 1930s.  Alexander died in 1939 after retiring, and was almost certainly replaced at Luibeg before his death.

In 1947 Robert Scott became the resident keeper of Luibeg, and he continued in that role into the 1970s when he retired to Quoich Cottage.