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James Farquharson, 3rd of Balmoral

James Farquharson was the second son of John ‘Black Colonel’ Farquharson, 3rd of Inverey and his second wife Margaret Leith daughter of George Leith, 3rd of Overhall.

Details are sketchy, but James Farquharson must have been born in the 17th century - his father died about 1698.  James Farquharson married Jean Leith - of the Overhall family - possibly a cousin, but they had no children.

In 1715 he joined the Jacobite Rising of that year with the rank of Major and was aide-de-camp to John ‘Bobin Jock’ Erskine, 6th Earl of Mar.  Legend has it that while escaping in the aftermath of this Jacobite Rising in 1716 that that he and Lord Fraser fell over the cliff at Pennan, Aberdeenshire - the fall killed Lord Fraser and injured James Farquharson.  James Farquharson appears to have escaped punishment for his participation in this Jacobite Rising.

In 1718 he became 3rd of Balmoral when he succeeded his uncle Charles Farquharson, 2nd of Balmoral.

About 1724 he was appointed Factor and Forester to James Erskine, Lord Grange and David Erskine, Lord Dun following the re-purchase of 1724.  In that role, in 1726, he carried out the 'removals' of Gleann Laoigh as instructed in a letter to James Farquharson.

He appears to have continued in the role of Factor and Forester to James Erskine, Lord Grange and David Erskine, Lord Dun into the 1730s - for example - GD124/17/157 includes his accounts of feu duties and rents in the lordship of Mar above the Bridge of Gairn for 1730. His role as Factor and Forester appears to have ended when James Erskine, Lord Grange and David Erskine, Lord Dun sold the feudal superiority to Baron Braco in 1735.

In 1745 he joined the Jacobite Rising of that year with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  On the 11th of October 1745, James Farquharson wrote a letter to William Murray in which he reveals his enthusiasm for the Jacobite Rising.

In 1746, on the 17th of January, he was shot in the shoulder at the Battle of Falkirk and took no further part in the Jacobite Rising.  Legend has it that he remained in the battle after his wounding and only withdrew from the Jacobite Rising because of the seriousness of his wound.

In 1748 he was charged with High Treason, but fortunately for him, the petition by James Farquharson was successful and he received a pardon from King George II.

In 1750 be became 8th of Inverey when he succeeded his half-brother Charles Farquharson, 7th of Inverey.

In 1753 his death was reported in the Scots Magazine :

At Edinburgh, James Farquharson, Esq; of Balmurral and Inverey

- Scots Magazine (1753) (p628)